BBC bosses want 20 per cent of guests to be from ethnic minorities

BBC bosses want 20 per cent of guests to be from ethnic minorities as they introduce voluntary scheme for producers to hit the target

  • BBC is introducing a voluntary scheme for show bosses to hit diversity targets 
  • Many popular and prominent programmes are expected to sign up to scheme
  • The BBC also announced a new ‘focus on diversity’ in children’s programming

The BBC wants 20 per cent of guests on its shows to be from ethnic minorities and 12 per cent to be disabled.

The broadcaster is introducing a voluntary scheme for show bosses to hit the targets, with many popular and prominent programmes expected to sign up.

It already has a gender equality scheme which expects equal on-screen representation for men and women. 

The BBC yesterday announced it would be using similar methods to boost representation based on race and disability.

The broadcaster is introducing a voluntary scheme for show bosses to hit the targets, with many popular and prominent programmes expected to sign up. Broadcasting House in London is pictured above in July

It added it would now ‘strive to include more diverse voices and contributors’. The corporation classifies contributors as presenters, reporters, commentators, spokesmen, analysts, academics and case studies. 

But it could also extend the ethnic and disability requirements to quiz contestants, guests on chat shows and other entertainment programmes. 

The 20 per cent target for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (Bame) contributors comes despite the 2011 census showing these groups make up just 14 per cent of the UK’s population. 

The proportion is now expected to be higher, but still below 20 per cent.

Recent figures showed that people from ethnic minorities made up more than 22 per cent of all TV on-screen contributions last year. 

Under the Equality Act definition, 19 per cent of working-age adults are classed as disabled – a group long under-represented on TV.

The gender of those who appear on BBC shows is measured in a voluntary scheme across programmes such as The One Show, BBC Breakfast and Songs Of Praise.

BBC director-general Tim Davie yesterday said he also wanted ethnicity and disability to be monitored.

Loose Women features all-back panel for the first time

Loose Women yesterday featured an all-black panel for the first time in its 21 years on air.

Presenter Charlene White, 40, led the show alongside comedian Judi Love, 40, actress Kelle Bryan, 45, and singer Brenda Edwards, 51.

Last October, ITV bosses found themselves at the centre of a race row when just one non-white presenter appeared on the channel on one day in the entire month.

Yesterday, the group made no mention of the landmark moment. But after the show, Miss White tweeted: ‘Yep we made history today. And when the cameras stopped rolling, I burst into tears.’

Presenter Charlene White, 40, led the show alongside comedian Judi Love, 40, actress Kelle Bryan, 45, and singer Brenda Edwards, 51

He insisted: ‘It’s absolutely vital the BBC reflects the public it serves.’ Mr Davie added that the 50:50 Project to help increase female contributions ‘has had a powerful impact over the last three years’.

More than 600 BBC teams have been collecting gender data for the project. This includes coverage of the Glastonbury Festival and Sports Personality Of The Year.

Mr Davie has previously indicated lack of diversity among the highest-paid BBC stars means more has to be done. 

The top ten includes Gary Lineker, Zoe Ball, Graham Norton and Fiona Bruce. The director-general said 18 per cent of all stars earning more than £150,000 are now from Bame backgrounds, compared with 12 per cent in 2016-17.

Yesterday the BBC also announced a new ‘focus on diversity’ in children’s programming.

This will include a CBBC series profiling figures from the black community including tennis player Serena Williams and civil rights leader Martin Luther King.

BBC director-general Tim Davie yesterday said he also wanted ethnicity and disability to be monitored

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